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20121228
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weighing on investor sentiment today. in europe, it was the last trading day of the year, and what a year it has been. our correspondent has kept an eye on the trading floor all year for us. he sent us this report from the floor of the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the year has ended a very successful 2012, also for the frankfurt exchange, which is why you see tables and chairs where there usually are not. there will be a celebration here shortly, and there is something to celebrate -- the dax performed to the tune of about 30%-plus this year, and many shares went up. only a few lag behind. the best shares almost doubled in value. when you look at the second tier, there were some that more than doubled in value. demand mostly responsible for that, according to -- the man most responsible for that according to everyone here is mario draghi. he promised the european central bank would do everything in its power to preserve the euro, and that really release energy and restored some confidence also for the bureau. in 2013, people see more share market. the dax could reach a new record highs. p
on the fiscal cliff. equities falling on wednesday in the u.s. on thursday when we opened here in europe, yesterday we saw a relatively stable markets. we closed out on a flat to slightly higher note for most of our european markets yesterday. this morning coming into trade, we're pretty flat. we've taken a bit of a dropdown on this drop but we're just a couple of points lower. in the asian session overnight, we managed to see gains back again. they lost again on the notion of the fiscal cliff not happening. shanghai composite higher by just over 1% in today's session. hang seng, and the kospi closing slightly higher across the board. the european markets mixed, but the ftse 100 still flat to higher. we're all looking towards these fiscal cliff negotiations. at the moment, we've got a couple more days of trade before we get to the end of the new year, as well. most analysts out there, they've been saying we're going to see a relatively flattish end to the year from where we are now given that we've seen such an increase of equities in the past 12 months. we've seen stellar outperformance
see stock markets in asia and europe up a bit. i think their expectation that washington will come to an agreement, i think that might be too early. i think this is still a very clear possibility that they could allow the deadline to pass and resolve this sometime in the middle of january. >> well, any red lution would be welcome. the cost as well, but these spending cuts and the tax rises effectively, the end of the tax concession, that's automatic. >> that is automatic yes but there is question where the money can be found if you like to plug the gap. they wouldn't have much impact for a while. but ultimately they would. and the difficulty is not necessarily the fact that the deadline, this deadline, which is some extent of official anyway would be overrun. it's more the uncertainty associated with it. how can you plan if you don't know what the tax rate will be? >> here in europe, one of the banks that caused a huge flurry at the time of its impact -- >> this could be a laymen of europe. we've had the euro in crisis which was sparked by soveren debt, which then destabilized debt
for the high. it's going to be chilly, winnipeg at minus 10. and let's look over towards europe in the british isles, cloud cover towards western europe. that is a very strong and deep low pressure system and the threat with this one as it pushes in, won't just bring heavy rain showers but strong high pressure down towards the south keeping things dry in the iberian peninsula and interacting creating lines close together, a tight pressure gradient, up to 120 kilometers per hour especially along the west coast of the u.k. and towards ireland, that's continuing to push to the northeast. it's going to be raising up temperatures. we'll see rain in the scandanavian peninsula and the threat there is snow melt and avalanche. farther towards the south, things will be remaining on the dry side. you'll see temperatures near the freezing mark towards vienna. 2 degrees for the high. london and paris, as warm air pulls in, you're seeing above average temperatures. london and paris 11 and 13 on your saturday. madrid, up to 11 degrees. let's look over towards eastern saz asia into japan. starting to bring he
into recession, and i think this will have repercussions in europe and asia as well. >> that sounds very serious. how are americans responding to all of this? >> the majority of the people are just frustrated. they are tired of this partisanship. they want politicians in washington just to do their job. i think consumer confidence will go down, and the stock markets, wall street will probably go south. >> thanks so much. >> as we just heard, uncertainty is the word now in markets now on both sides. let's get the lowdown on sentiment among german investors as trading closed in frankfurt. >> nobody here believes that the u.s. will fall over that fiscal cliff. it would just be too great, the consequences to dyer, not just for the united states, but for the world economy, too, also for germany, but people do not know, and they do not like the prospect of a decision may be taking more time, may be even reaching into the year 2013. it would be a pretty bad start, a rumbly start to the new year, people think. the trading was careful. the shares lost some momentum in late trading, late european trading
risk factors related to u.s. and china and europe. and fiscal cliff issue in the u.s. is one of top concerns. that's, i think, just a matter of time. obama administration will be able to overcome the difficulty of this situation sooner or later. so i don't care about it. and regarding china, china economic trend is another big concern. but, we think china has already achieved soft landing. >> so he's optimistic about those risk factors and he expects the nikkei to hit 13,000 by this time next year. so we'll keep you updated on the markets as we move into 2013. >>> for most investors this is also the last trading day in currencies in tokyo. the dollar continues to gain strength against the yen. $buying intensified during the day sending the u.s. currency above the 76 yen level. dollar changed hands at its highest levels in two years and five months. it's now nearly ten yen higher than at the beginning of this year. the yen has been losing strength since october. that's because the market speculation, the bank of japan would take further monetary easing measures. the yen came under pr
is good but we have been held back by the negativism by the fiscal issues europe and the u.s. >> susie: you told me there were oil and gas americ mergersu think that tech could be an air yeah wirarea. what kind of gived guidelines can you give to investors so they can take advantage of these trends. >> there is a huge boom inenergd healthcarhealthcare in particule new healthcare system is going to be a lot. you have to look at companies that have had success but need more capital to get to the next level. exploration and production companies and energy that have done well and need capital. you can raise it or you can join forces with somebody else. very often the decision is to merge and not raise capital and take that risk. >> susie: and in tech what should they look for. tech is such a huge area we have a few seconds left what are your thoughts? >> look at the base companiesan. the kind of service that's county of victoria to their -- o their base line services. >> thanks bob, have a greatweek. bob pr profusek. >> susie: the price of gold fell slightly today, as the fiscal cliff dram
coming. >> all aboard. >> think about how often have we been clobbered by the mess in europe. every time things start to look less horrible across the atlantic, every time we begin to wonder it maybe, just maybe, the worst is finally past, there's some hideous headline out of greece or portugal or spain or italy that the comes back with a vengeance and the s&p gets bashed down by a torrent of selling. that's why it's so important to prepare yourself and your stocks for the next catastrophe around the corner. expected or unexpected, so that you can make money in any market, or at least lose less and not just when things are going smoothly. you have to build this stuff into what i call your world view. you have to assume that somewhere, sometime, something will go wrong. i'm not saying you should be a super skeptic perma-bear, not at all. over the course of my 31-plus years in this business i've seen the averages climb way too way, watched the market make people way too much money to ever be that cynical and close-minded. being negative all the time has not historically been a lucrative st
for the future of the world and share it with us. and wishes are send in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is rainbow fund.org and it is free and we will printout your wish on a piece of paper and fold it into a crane and put it up on the tree. now, i want to thank, some key people who helped with this year's tree. first i want to start off with our core team, our core creative team and that consists of karin kai and linda mihara and thank you they have been working on the tree for seven years. >> and this year we have the help of dozens of volunteers and i want to particularly acknowledge the university of berkeley alfa, fi omega service community and volunteers fr
, the meeting at the white house, 3:00 between the president and some congressional leaders. as for europe, getting some data out of japan overnight and some data out of europe. currently red arrows across the board, in london, paris, and frankfort. our road map begins at the white house. congressional leaders set to meet with the president, 3:00 p.m. this afternoon. senator reid has already said hopes of a deal are fading quickly. just two trading days left until the cliff. and it's not just the fiscal cliff. wind farms and dairy are set to get hit. >> the ports of the east coast and gulf coast are bracing for a potential strike. the potential for this, midnight sunday with a shutdown threatening to threaten 20% of the cargo traffic. >> and instagram feeling the sting of the flap around privacy with users, fleeing the site. how will this impact facebook? >> as we mentioned, dennis berman, "wall street journal" market place editor is joining us here on set once again for the next hour. good to have you back, dennis. lots to talk about between the cliff and other news. >> three days before
despite china and other emerging rising markets and that has been clear the past two years, where europe is in recession, japan continues to languish and yet the u.s. economy has shown resiliency but it is not immune from fiscal shock and that's something i clearly continue to monitor. >> all right, joe, thank you very much for coming on the practical. have we have good news for the in you year. thank you very much. >> you as well. thank you. >> joe davis, chief economist at ativan guard group >> susie: still ahead, the top tech trends for 2013, or how your cell phone will become an even bigger part of your life in the new year. >> susie: a lot of mixed messages for investors today. joining us now to sort through it all, ann miletti, senior portfolio manager at wells fargo advantage funds. >> so, anne, what do you think you heard, the economist talking about a mild recession. are we in for a correction in the stock market if that happens? >> i think right now the market is trying to predict how long this uncertainty is going to last. so right now, you know, because the market is a measur
've been hearing our guests across europe telling us they are worried about the way we can see markets trade lower once people come back and realize we haven't had any agreement reached on the fiscal cliff. and that essential doesn't look likely at this point. >> okay, kelly. i couldn't help detect a little -- i mean, you're over there now. you're international. the most important story of 2013 is something with japan? >> yes, joe. >> though, no, no. it's here. >> yes, yes, nope. >> that's the third biggest thing. that's a little tail. that doesn't wag the big st. bernard that is the united states. >> here is one reason. japan isn't necessarily important because of the size of its economy. so if you're talking about global gpt growth, the u.s. is still the juggernaut there. >> fiscal abyss. fiscal abyss. >> japan is not only the leading gauge of what is happening across europe, but potentially what could happen in the u.s. if these policies aren't -- enough. it's will case of this extremely high debt load, something we're discussing in the u.s. and europe right now. if it manages to en
appreciate it. ? thank you. >> europe's fiscal woes dominated the american markets most of the year. >> the fragile european economy not out of the woods just yet. here is jimmy pathakukas of the institute. it was "barron's" just this week. this is the year to invest in europe. do you disagree with that or can the two work together? >> well, you know, they say the united states don't fight the fed. in europe you would say don't fight the ecb as long as they believe that they would do whatever it takes to keep the euro together, i guess that's a positive, but remember, you have an economy back in recession that was in terrible shape to begin with and i think you have a lot of austerity fatigue going on spain, italy, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how shoul
of europe i suppose, in the 1880s. do you favor any particular moments of those? maybe it was in the crimea. i mean, i've always thought of this as being sort of ottoman. well... i think one of those things is right... ...but i don't think the crimea is the one. right. i think i'll favor the low countries, or certainly the european grand tour. it's much more likely this piece here didn't start out life in this frame, so i think what we've got is probably a 19th-century frame. do you have any clue how old this might be? maybe 17th century. i don't know. i think it's rather earlier than that, actually, for various reasons. i think it's been put into this frame probably in the 1880s. would that sort of fit with the dates that they were traveling around europe? yes, they were traveling 1870s onwards, yes. so i suspect that someone has put it together to sell to a northern european traveler as a treasure to take home. not a fake of the day. not a fake of the day. no, in fact, i'm sure it's not a fake of the day and i think perhaps we'll move on to why. firstly, i think it
winter, the u.n. said that ukraine was the worst hit by severe cold in europe. more than 100 people died then. now volunteers are urging everyone to do everything possible to save lives. the government is opening temporary shelters for homeless people around the country where they can warm themselves and have a hot drink. many have complained that very often these shelters on and on the outskirts of major cities of sometimes too hard to find. >> you need to take a bus to get there but i don't have any money to pay for my fair. i don't think i would be better off there. >> many homeless ukrainians will have to spend the new year holiday in these temporary shelters. according to weather forecasts, if a bit warmer in the ukraine in january. >> an ambitious mission to drill through 3 kilometers of antarctic ice has been cut short. they aimed to explore a lake that had been hidden for half a million years. the project to find hints of simple life existing in these extreme conditions. however, they failed and the team was forced to abandon the project. >> this is science at his toughest into t
back to the norm alter temperatures. and in europe, a messy picture. lots of numerous gust reports. 79 to 82 across much of the central regions. we still have these several low pressure systems creating precipitation, especially heavy in the coastal areas, with some thunderstorms the on top. but this system will be further intensifying as it moves towards the british isles, bringing gusts of 140 miles per hour, enough to damage houses and uproot trees. precipitation is likely to continue throughout your weekend. temperatures, not too bad. london and paris, both at 11 degrees and moscow at freezing. stockholm, just minus 4 for your high. here is your extended forecast. >>> our lead story this our. chinese commanders are doing more to make their presence known in the south china sea. they've deployed a patrol vessel for the first time. the maritime safety administration launched the ship that weighs more than 1,500 tons and runs more than 90 meters long. it has a heli pad and can sail 7,000 kilometers without refueling. diplomats from nations are expected to react strongly to the deploym
rates for elect -- electricity in europe. things will get pricier. >> electricity bills have gone up dramatically and will go up even more. i'm really worried about people becoming very poor. and it's only going to get worse. >> the government announced the energy u-turn last year after the fukushima nuclear disaster. it wants the country to abandon nuclear power and turn to renewable sources such as the wind and the sun but the power grid isn't ready. they visited a plant near berlin to see what progress is being made in improving the grid. he says he worries about the short-term finaltial gain but the benefits are great. >> we are explaining the nature of the challenge. but after all, there is quite an impressive public support for the energy u-turn. more than half of the people are in favor of it. >> but there's another number thatening la merkel might need to worry about it. 4/5th of germans might be thinking of their electricity bill when they choose their next government. if a long, hard winter brings big bills then she might be paying the price as well. >> venezuela has one of
the mediterranean, middle east and europe. >> this is san francisco with the largest armenian food festival and widely recognized as one of the best food festivals in the area. we have vendors that come up from fresno, los angeles. we have everyone here in the neighborhood. that's really what it is, is drawing people to see a little bit of our culture and experience what we experience weekend in and weekend out. >> we are behind the scenes now watching the chef at work preparing some delicious armenian. this is a staple in armenian cooking, right? >> absolutely since the beginning of time. soldiers used to skewer it on swords. we have chicken ka bob, beef, lam, onions, parsley, over 2 pounds of meat being cooked in three days. >> after all that savory pro seen, i was ready to check out the fresh veggie options. * protein this is armenian. tomatoes and olive oil, that makes it summer food. what i'm doing is i'm putting some latinae. it's kind of like cream cheese without. when they offer you food, you have to eat it. they would welcome you and food is very important for them. >> in every ar
in the '80s that has been revised. if you go to canada or europe, it's very common there, even on the east coast it's very common to. and they have gotten much better machines so you can now put a machine like that in front of the store. >> is that at whole foods at 4th street? >> no, it's at the safeway at 4th street and one at clement and 7th, safeway and one i believe at the marina safeway. >> are they being used? >> yes, they are. >> they are kind of limited, again, if someone comes up with a shopping cart it kind of shuts it down, but for the family or for folks, that is kind of the small-scale solution. that if we get the prices of those down, they are a little expensive at the moment. that could provide convenience in a lot of neighborhoods. and then you would need that distribution system to collect it. i think we do have some solutions. >> director dick-endrizzi? >> just to make sure that commissioner ortiz-cartagena, if the supermarket isn't there and then the small businesses in that half-mile radiuss, they are not required to participate in the program. it's just when th
a family of eastern european immigrants. they were mostly born in europe, all of my grandparents were born there. when my grandparents came here, they were older people. english was not something they were very interested in. my grandparents spoke russian, romanian, yiddish, and german. a sixth language? no way. they learned english, but they were never comfortable with it and they forgot it as soon as they could. my parents didn't speak english either, but they were going to live their lives in this country so they've learned it. they always spoken with a heavy accent and was something that was always a struggle for them. as they got older, they didn't want to do it anymore. my father spoke his last words in yiddish. we are born here, my native english speakers. i think you can mostly understand me. what i think about technology, i see a parallel and my family because i think about my parents, my parents have really become my grandparents' generation. if technology is something they did not want to learn. boy, would she like to forget it. she hates technology. we have really become a skil
to extend its hand to it is long, whether its capital should no longer stand alone in europe. >>> sports news, nadal said he will not play next month and the australian open because of illness. he is still struggling with a stomach virus. the illness has disrupted his recovery from a knee injury. he confirmed today that he will miss both the australian open and the warm-up event in doha. >>> a wave of films catering to older audiences. one of the most successful stars british actors in their sixties and seventies. they have been doing well worldwide, particularly in the u.k. and the u.s. from the york, we have this report. >> a trend, old people in the movies. next month, a movie set at a retirement home story musicians and several british actors. tommy lee jones succeeded this year in "i hope springs" been called a midlife romantic comedy. and then there was the marigold hotel, the story of a british retiree at a hotel in india that has been very profitable, costing $10 million to make, taking in $140 million around the world. the film cast is unusual because of many of its older charac
of miami and many peopl from all ports of the world, india, europe, china, who wanted to stay here after they graduated and work on their companies, create new start-ups, but they were unable to do so because after you graduate you get a job with an existing company or you leave and for many them that was not a good option and they left and took their ideas and companies with them. >> so th get their fancy education here and go back to indian or somewhere else. >>guest: w would like to stem the tide and keep them closer, and bring them back to the united states so they can create new job and new companies. >> if they worked for a company they could have stayed? >>guest: if you get sponsored by a large corporation you can get the prop visas to work in the country but you cannot self sponsor and you cannot be here and create your own start-ups without going through some pret significant legal work. >> to build this big ship where people live cost as lot of money and peop are actually giving you money fo this? >>guest: theface book funder and creator of pay pay pal is helping us and bringin
intelligence, and were extraordinarily heroic and died in very high casualty rates in europe. and so when chet comes back to san francisco, those people who signed no no were looked upon as cowards. they were traitors. they sat out the war where these other people died. everyone a friend, an uncle or somebody they knew who had died, lost an arm, or was killed in service. chet comes back and he is literally spit on by his own community. so my protagonist is someone who is an ex-jazz musician, who spent his adult years playing with black groups, he comes back to san francisco at a time when japan town is still sort of unraveling from this sort of who lives here, who doesn't live here, and he wants to find japan town again, find his own sort of home while at the same time around him his own community is looking at him as if he is a traitor. so as he says and used to say in the play, i'm on the outside of the outside. my country thinks i'm a criminal, my own community thinks i'm a traitor. how does he sort of find home for himself in america given that kind of a set up? so that's where the stories
of the world, india, europe, china, who wanted to stay here after they graduated and work on their companies, create new start-ups, but they were unable to do so because after you graduate you get a job with an existing company or you leave and for many them that was not a good option and they left and took their ideas and companies th them. >> so they get their fancy education here and go back to indian or somewhere else. >>guest: we would like to stem the tide and keep them closer, and bring them back to the united states so they can create new jobs. and new companies. >> if they worked for a company they could have stayed? >>guest: if you get sponsored by a large corporation you can get the prop visas to work in the country but you cannot self sponsor and you cannot be here and create your own start-ups without going through some pretty significant legal work. >> to build this big ship where people live cost as lot of money and people are actually giving you money for this? >>guest: the face book funder and creator of pay pay pal is helping us and bringing in a number of investors. he wil
and europe and canada -- they are only 16%. so there is a very good reason why just about every industrial country has a really low capital gains tax rate. that's because policymakers just about everywhere know that low capital gains tax rates are crucial for a growth of economy and entrepreneurship and high-technology industries. gerri: so what if we compare favorably with a lot of developed countries out there -- what would be the practical effect? >> it will slow the flow of venture capital and investment for high-technology companies. if you think about every major high-tech company like apple or microsoft or ebay or amazon, they were all nurtured by high income people putting money in early on to these startup companies. we dramatically cut the capital gains tax rate from 40% to 20% before, so what we are going to do is kill america's entrepreneurial economy. gerri: let's get into the details of this. why you would want to keep these capital gains taxes low. you say it is an issue of double taxation. >> that's right. corporate profits are taxed at the corporate level. and they are tax
were mainly back in those days focused on fighting the war in europe. >> harris: for people just joining us, general norman schwarzkopf has died. he led operation desert shield and desert storm which were the largest deployments of u.s. forces and equipment since the vietnam war and general scales you just mentioned president george h.w. bush is ailing in the hospital but we have just gotten a statement from the former president and i want to share it with our viewers if you are still with us. the former president says "barbara and i mourn the loss of a true american patriot and one of the great mill tare leaders of our generation. hailing from westpoint. general norman schwarzkopf to me epitomized the service the dallesty creed that served our great nation through this trying natural crises. a good and decent man and a good friend. barbara and i send our condolences to his from our family. this from president george h.w. bush ailing in the hospital but speaking out in his statement about the passing of general schwarzkopf. general scales, are you still with us by phone? did we l
with someone like mr. storm, you had a westerner, someone who had a passport could travel in western europe and someone who wouldn't fit the typical security profiles. >> storm said he had no doubt his efforts led to the death of al awlaki. while the story might be true there are a lot of people involved in these operations. >> absolutely. i think there's never a single piece to the puzzle in finding a terrorist like anwar al awlaki. there's usually multiple angles multiple sources, multiple ways of intelligence sources finding someone like him. no doubt there were operatives giving us information, giving other intelligence services information, but that's how intelligence work happens. it's putting pieces of a puzzle together, and i this i that's what happened here with finding and ultimately killing of anwar al awlaki. >> i was fascinated to see the western bride angle that awlaki would like that western bride. it makes sense why he has the western recruits but a western bride as well? >> keep in mind rebecca, that anwar al awlaki was born in the united states, made
. storm you had a westerner, someone who had a passport. he could travel in europe and someone who wouldn't have fit the typical security profiles. >> storm had no doubt that his efforts led to the death of awlaki. while this story might be true, there are a lot of people involved in these operations. >> absolutely. i think there's never a single piece to the puzzle in finding a terrorist like anwar awlaki. there's usually multiple angles, sources, multiple ways for intelligent services finding people like him. no doubt there were operatives giving information, giving information, but that's how intelligence works, happens. it's putting pieces of a puzzle together. thichg that's what happened here in finding and killing anwar al awlaki. >> i was fascinated they he would want a western bride. it makes sense why he's got western recruits. but western brides as well? >> keep in mind he was born in the united states, made his name in the jihadi circle as a western voice for the movement, and so to have a western wife or western-based wife was probably helpful to him. he was probably looking f
on the negative. focus on some of the positive things like europe didn't fall over. interest rates are reasonable in spain, italy, and great britain. ashley: corporate earnings, signs of weakness in the last earnings season. concernedded about that? >> i think that it's cyclical. i think there's been little signs. i think we have to get employment together in the united states. housing is starting to come back. we're -- slowly, but in the north east in particular, there's more demand, and there's less housing inventory, but in the rest of the country, we have to wait and see on that. employment is really, really the key thing, and so what comes out of all the negotiations and how we employee people, infrastructure, and all of that makes a difference. ashley: companies hunkering down, a lot of cash, but not doing in until washington gets the act together. >> means technology, for example, could be a big sector. if companies get signals from washington and go out and invest into hiring people, putting technology online, it could be great, but we're just waiting and waiting and waiting, which is why
on in the u.s. with the fiscal cliff, and before that, it was all about europe. david: larry, your picks, disney and direct tv, i know you like the vegas stocks, las vegas sans, boyd gaming as well, but what about john's point that just to be safe because you never know. i mean, the worse can happen, happened before, and could happen again, those jokers inside the beltway very often don't come to a conclusion. wouldn't it be safe to put at least 10 #% of the portfolio in cash right now just in case? >> i just can't see it. the math is so compelling on the other side, and you have this just incredible sentiment. thirty years now, you have not been able to lose money in bonds. a lot of people think that it's impossible to lose money in bonds, and it is. you surely are not going to make any money in bonds other than clip your coupon. you're not going to make any money in cash. david: let me just stop you for a sec about bonds here because it is not impossible to lose money on bonds if the companies they are based on go bankrupt or the governments they are based on go bankrupt, and people ar
to their country of origin. >>> this is the most-watched singing contest in europe. it's got the glitz, the glamour, but -- >> it costs to perform, and it costs to stage it. and what do you get back? bluntly, you get a bunch of hoopla and a few pom-poms. >> wow. what some european countries on the verge of bankruptcy, many feel participating in the contest, well, strikes the wrong chord. through diet and exercise, alli can help you lose one more by blocking some of the fat you eat. let's fight fat with alli. ♪ i get congested. but now, with zyrtec-d®, i have the proven allergy relief of zyrtec®, plus a powerful decongestant. zyrtec-d® lets me breath freer, so i can love the air. [ male announcer ] zyrtec-d®. behind the pharmacy counter. no prescription needed. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super s
has functioned for years as an easy-to-enter gateway into the rest of europe. and one that by all accounts has made a mess of its immigration system. many migrants are illegal: largely tolerated in good times, but increasingly for greeks, no more. >> ( translated ): i don't have a problem with immigrants in general. but i have a problem with those who come here and don't find work and they resort to crime. >> brown: and has this been getting worse? >> everyday it's getting worse. >> brown: this man said he opposes violence against immigrants. but others clearly feel differently and the anti- immigrant sentiment helps explain the rise of the golden dawn party, which won 18 seats in parliament in the last election and has seen its popularity grow further in more recent polls to third among all parties. golden dawn describes itself as greek nationalists. but, with its swastika-like symbol, its rhetoric and street tactics, it's widely seen as neo-nazi. and its supporters have become more brazen in carrying out physical attacks on migrants, including this one caught on camera in a mark
on the macro because the macro is moving stocks and moving the market. things like europe, the european debt crisis, things like our fiscal cliff crisis, a slowdown in china. this is how stocks are moving right now. it's no longer how many cannes of coke did we sell last quarter. it's really tied to this so it matters more than before. they're panicking and starteding to see it. look no further than the consumer confidence number dropping, the retail sales. ge has blamed some poorer results this past quarter on lack of investment. you know, honeywell is seeing the pain. they're not filling empty positions. it's already -- it has been starting to affect companies for probably, you know, at least the past quarter already. >> okay. thank you, joy, and thank you leigh. remember, president obama is going to make a statement on the fiscal cliff talks at 5:45 eastern time and msnbc will provide live coverage. until then, chris matthews is up next with the best "sideshow" moments of the year and the nra's best excuses for standing in the way of any and all reasonable restrictions on guns. this is "h
important if you live in europe as i do. actually, the idea of taking 50 million people out of poverty over the next ten years if that's possible, wow, after the stuff we have done on aides as malaria. that's the reason to get out of bed, mr. president. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. c'mon, michael! get in the game! [ male announcer ] don't have the hops for hoops with your buddies? lost your appetite for romance? and your mood is on its way down. you might not just be getting older. you might have a treatable condition called low testosterone or low t. millions of men, forty-five or older, may have low t. so talk to your doctor about low t. hey, michael! [ male announcer ] and step out of
of the issues, not really solve anything, kick the can down the road much like they do in europe and get your mild positive reaction going into the jobs data on friday. >> do you think we get a definitive move in this market one way or the other with some announcement out of washington, or is this market just so tired of all of the developments there? what do you think? >> well, there's still a risk-on trend, and if they kick the can down the road or actually come to some kind of compromise, that trend is intact, and you'll see going into the first few months of the year i believe very positive price action for all the equity indexs? >> what now, rick? what say you? what now? >> i liked dan greenhouse's comment. in a perverse sort of way. if there really is any austerity, you'll hear an ouch or some squawking or bellyaching which is the fiscal cliff. if we went over the cliff, they be we actually would have at least a touch of austerity, but nobody wants that. i contend, and i said this back in 2008, we're going to have to experience some pain. i don't think there's any way around it. it's ju
in europe. google, amazon, apple are all under did your reese duress from the e.u. operators. >> who is most at risk? i'm going to come down and put words in your mouth and say that you don't think the instagram deal was a good one for facebook. >> i think mark zuckerberg needs to go back under his hood on that one. he's got a billion dollar boondoggle in instagram. he has not figured out how to monetize it. that was one of the drivers thinking he could get away with selling photos to the advertisers. look, the big furor this week was the collapse of 25% of instagram's users. they only had 16 million users and they went down to 12. that's less than 1% of -- yeah. >> -- facebook's users. >> netflix when they decided to go to a different pricing plan, they lost their users. let me probe companies that you think will be winners and why in 2013. take it away. >> first of all, i think we all have to focus on twitter, which has the big mo and is really, really getting traction right now with advertisers. the issue with trwitter, will they go public in 2013or at some point? i think you will see twi
are. >> an interesting point you've made when you look at the frac, parliamentary parties in europe, a fractuous extremely group come to power, we don't think of that happening in america. we're the worst of a parliamentary system right now. >> that's ugly here. for all the things we complain about our government it's pretty good than most countries. they swing this way and that way and 20 different parties and we're in this situation where there's no iron center here to anchor things and it's not just this fiscal cliff. it's everything. >> we are in a quasi-parliamentary system with political institutions aren't built for it. our structure does not allow for this level of partisanship. as you look at this as you point out, we are on an unsustainable path in the long run in our fiscal kind of situation. republicans and democrats have to live with each other probably for the next four years. at least for the next two years but likely the next four years. is there a path that you think makes sense that is a truce line that would be reasonable for both sides to accept? >> well, we'd re
because it's pretty clear it's both a competitor and a partner. number four-- europe. the european union was fractured by too much debt and the austerity plans to fix it. that saga is far from over. number three-- the housing market finally, finally bottomed out. the combination of low home prices and continued record low mortgage rates set off a building and buying spree. investors began buying entire neighborhoods. but first-time buyers were also able to get a home of their own for the first time in years, as long as they had a hefty down payment. number two-- the election. more than just about obama and romney. it was about socialism and capitalism. it was about spending and cutting, about what kind of role government should have in your life. number one is the fiscal cliff. lawmakers saw it coming but didn't bother to pay any attention to it until after the election. had they put politics aside and dealt with it earlier, who knows how strong the u- s economy would be right now? >> jacqueline: often tends already 40's in vallejo, daly city 45 in pleasanton. get ready for a chilly nigh
occupied europe. >> reporter: or from front line forces. even bomber crews carried pigeons. this museum curator tells this story about one avian hero, royal blue. >> he was on a bomber, went down in holland, and he flew from holland about four hours back to england, and they sent the plane out and picked the full crew up. >> there were a quarter of a million pigeons enlisted in the second world war, all of them played a part in the war and they saved many lives and some heroic acts. it is a story that should be told and it needs to be shouted. >> reporter: they didn't just carry messages, but film too. utterly indispensable, a vital part of the allied war machine. >> all the details for the first four days were brought back with the pigeons. >> reporter: almost all messages were coded. this message, 27 blocks of letters, may now be offering up some of its secrets. canadian researchers say it was sent by a soldier, dropped behind enemy lines. a sergeant using a world war i code book reporting on german tank movements. >> the latest information that has to be checked is we understand the
of a sensible attitude in europe and the uk about cost reduction. as i said, i had two children there. i had fantastic care, top quality care, up until the moment i had a healthy kid, and then that's where you start to see the cost cutting. you go into a room with 20 other people. that's okay, if that means everybody can have their pregnancy paid for, that's a great tradeoff. >> let me ask you a real time question here in the united states of america. we'll use my mother as an example. she lived to be 94 years of age. the last year of her life, she was fairly healthy until the last two or three months of her life when her pacemaker, problem with that, pneumonia, a stroke. she was back in the hospital on the average of every two weeks. i would take her back to the hospital. who gets penalized in a case like that? the hospital, the patient, who gets penalized? >> in this case, it would be the hospital. that's what's changing now. they're looking at ways to try to prevent people from continually coming back. this lady is not at the end of her life. she has some chronic conditions, but if you wa
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